Migration Studies

The Colleges of the Fenway shared minor in Migration Studies addresses an urgent need to prepare undergraduate students for professional and civic lives in a world increasingly marked by diversity.

Students sitting in class

The Migration Studies minor enhances student understandings of migration, emigration, and immigration through strong scholarly foundations, interdisciplinary case studies, and engagement with the Boston community. Students will grapple with important questions about diversity and what it means to live in a “country of immigrants,” while enhancing their global awareness.

Students planning careers in business, education, social work, health care, the arts, policy and government, law, nongovernmental organizations, and nonprofit administration likely will come from, work with, and/or serve immigrant communities. By adding an interdisciplinary repertoire of courses specifically addressing immigration to their undergraduate careers, students will be well positioned to succeed in these fields and to bring a comprehensive understanding of migration and immigration to their professional and civic lives.

Required Courses

Five courses (four classroom-based, one service-learning/community partnership)

Introduction to Migration StudiesOffered annually in Spring, rotating instructors, rotating campuses. All students must take "Introduction to Migration Studies," an introductory-level course familiarizing students with the major issues, methods, and frameworks of migration and immigration studies. 

Electives: All Migration Studies Minor students must select three electives from the list of approved classes, bearing in mind the following requirements:

  • It is highly recommended that at least one course be taken away from the student's home institution within the COF.
  • Students must take at least one advanced seminar (3000- or 300-level, etc.), from the list of approved courses.
  • Students must take one course not in their declared major's discipline

Elective Options

Simmons University

  • ENGL161      American Literature 1865-1910, Imagining America
  • ENGL179      Human Rights & Global Literature
  • ENGL230      Postcolonial Film
  • HIST213        Race and Ethnicity in U.S. History
  • HIST214        History of the African Diaspora
  • HIST217        Caribbean History
  • HIST240        The Atlantic World, 1500-1800
  • FREN265       Francophone Short Stories and Films
  • FREN311       Contemporary Issues in France
  • FREN316       Outside France: Persepectives from the French-Speaking World
  • POLS215       The Politics of Exclusion
  • SOCI330        Transnational Studies
  • WGST/AST210 Sisters of the African Diaspora

Emmanuel College

  • ART2204       Art in the Contact Zone
  • HIST1114      Creating the Atlantic World
  • HIST2106      A History of New England: 1500-Present
  • HIST2128      Immigrants in the American Experience
  • HIST2207      Slavery in Global History
  • HIST3107      A History of Boston
  • HIST3205      Themes in the History of the American West
  • HIST3404      East Asia Migration and Diaspora in Global Perspectives
  • HIST3412      Immigrant Kitchens: a Glocal Perspective on Identity, Ethnicity and Foodways
  • POLS2301     Politics of Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
  • POLS2417     Statecraft and Globalization
  • POLSC2801  Food Policy and Social Justice
  • SOC3201       Worlds in Motion: The Causes and Consequences of Migration

MassArt

  • LALW317     Literature from Immigrants in the USA
  • LALW365     Women's Literature in Comparative Perspective
  • LASS404      Asian Diasporas and American Experiences
  • LASS251      Chinatown and Beyond: A World Historical Perspective
  • LASS254      Immigration and Race in the USA

So you know that Simmons is a great place to be, you've learned about our programs, maybe even come for a visit...now you're ready to apply! Let's get started.

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