Learning Communities

The Learning Community provides you with the opportunity to understand a topic from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Thanks to the course's focus on integrative learning, you will learn the intricacies of two different disciplines (via two standalone courses) and how they relate to a topic, issue or problem (via an integrative seminar taught jointly by the two course instructors). Examples of Learning Communities may include: "France and its Cultural Legacy," "Community Food Systems," and "Sustaining a Nonprofit Organization."

Students in class

Fall 2021

1. Newton's Insights: Integrated Physics And Calculus (10 credits)

In these meetings we will use calculus to solve fundamental problems in physics, such as simple harmonic motion, planetary motion, and calculating moments of inertia. The insights we get from very real world physics also help to bolster our understanding of the fundamental calculus processes of differentiation and integration. The two subjects are intrinsically linked, and studying them together makes each one easier. **NOTE: This is a 10-credit Learning Community.

MATH-121-LC Calculus II

Brown (4 credits) (QL KCA)
T/TH 9:00 - 10:50 am
Prerequisite: MATH 120 or equivalent.
Covers integral calculus and applications to area, volume, etc., transcendental functions, techniques of integration, polar coordinates, and improper integrals.

PHYS-114-LC Fundamentals of Physics I (Lecture)

P. Jason White (4 credits) (SCI KCA)
M/W 9:00 - 9:50 am
First course in Physics for science majors (calculus based). Concentrates on the subjects of mechanics: motion, mass, force, energy, momentum, and torque and static equilibrium. Additional material includes fluids and simple harmonic motion. Three hours of lecture, a one-hour, guided-inquiry learning session and a three hour lab per week.

Fundamentals of Physics (Lab)
Students will register for one of the following lab sections:

  • PHYS-112L-LC, F 11:00 - 1:50 (White)

Please note that this is the designated lab section for the Learning Community. Requests to enroll in other lab sections will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

LCIS-201-01 Integrative Seminar: Newton's Insights

Brown, White (2 credits)
F 9:30 - 10:50 am
In this seminar we will use the abstraction of calculus to solve physics problems and reinforce our understanding of physics, and will use the physical insights of physics to bolster our understanding of calculus. It is not an accident that Newton invented freshman calculus in order to formulate freshman physics. Following in his footsteps, we will use each subject to support our understanding of the other.

2. Surveillance In Modern America (8 credits)

This Learning Community uses the War on Drugs and the War on Terror to investigate the modern history and consequences of surveillance in America. In doing so, the course examines the rhetoric and politics used to promote surveillance, the different policies and tools that make up its application, and the impact that increased levels of surveillance have had on American society. Using the unique but occasionally overlapping histories and consequences of these two wars, the course will emphasize the intersection of American surveillance with the social dimensions of race, class, ethnicity, religion, and gender.

POLS-228-LC The War on Drugs

Rosenthal (3 credits) (SH KCA)
M 9:00 - 10:50 am
This course explores the War on Drugs that has been waged in the United States over the last fifty years. In doing so, it focuses on the history and development of the war, considers its various consequences, evaluates its effectiveness, and analyzes current reform efforts.

SOCI-233-LC The War on Terror

Selod (3 credits) (GC KCA)
T 9:00 - 10:50 am
This course examines the history and impact of the War on Terror in the United States and globally. The course will examine the cultural, political and economic motivations for the War on Terror and the impact it has had on communities of color in the United States.

LCIS-201-02-LC Integrative Seminar: Surveillance in Modern America

Rosenthal, Selod (2 credits)
W 9:00 - 10:20 am
This integrative seminar will compare and contrast the histories, consequences, and reform efforts of the surveillance involved in these two wars. In doing so, it will emphasize how these wars have cut across dimensions of race, class, ethnicity, religion, and gender.

3. Skills For Business Success (8 credits)

This course focuses on the interfaces between organizational behavior and management accounting by taking a contemporary approach to understanding how people behave in organizations and the financial decision-making required to succeed. Topics covered include human behaviors within organizations, managerial problem-solving and decision-making, communication skills, budgeting, responsibility accounting, and break-even analysis. The integrative seminar utilizes the organizational skills, team project management, and communication skills gained in the organizational behavior course and the managerial accounting decision making skills gained in managerial accounting to develop a semester long project to be presented in a "Shark Tank" setting.

BUS-234-LC Organization Communication and Behavior

Shapiro (3 credits) (SH KCA)
M 6:00 - 7:50 pm
Organizational Behavior (OB) is the systematic study, and the careful application of knowledge about how people think and behave within organizations. In successful organizations, leaders competently manage and organize a complex system of personalities, talent, teamwork and resources to meet strategic objectives. This course takes a contemporary approach to the interdisciplinary study of human behavior within organizations. It combines social science and psychology theories with practical workplace applications in an analytical framework that explores individual, interpersonal, and system-wide dynamics. Throughout the semester you will gain insight into your strengths as an individual, team-member, and leader; identify areas for personal improvement; and hone your managerial problem-solving and decision-making skills.

ACCT-120-LC Managerial Accounting

TBA (3 credits) (QL)
T 6:00 -7:50 pm
This course focuses on the interfaces between organizational behavior and management accounting by taking a contemporary approach to understanding how people behave in organizations and the financial decision-making required to succeed. Topics covered include human behaviors within organizations, managerial problem-solving and decision-making, communication skills, budgeting, responsibility accounting, and break-even analysis. The integrative seminar utilizes the organizational skills, team project management, and communication skills gained in the organizational behavior course and the managerial accounting decision making skills gained in managerial accounting to develop a semester long project to be presented in a "Shark Tank" setting.

LCIS-201-03 Integrative Seminar: Skills for Business Success

Shapiro, TBA (2 credits)
W 6:00 - 7:20 pm
The integrative seminar utilizes the organizational skills, team project management, and communication skills gained in the organizational behavior course and the managerial accounting decision making skills gained in managerial accounting to develop a semester-long project to be presented in a “Shark Tank” setting.

4. Crime And Punishment: Legal Truths And Felonious Fictions (8 credits)

This Learning Community joins literature about law, order, and crime with study of the constitutional standards for arrest, prosecution, and punishment as well as current policies on policing and criminality. Through this juxtaposition, students will gain a basic appreciation and understanding of what law and order is, and how it is portrayed in popular culture.

*Students should register for one of the following LC groupings: 

1) ENGL-168-LC, POLS-168-LC, LCIS-201-04, or 
2) ENGL-168-LC2, POLS-168-LC2, LCIS-201-06

ENGL-168-LC Crime Literature

Fash (3 credits) (ALA KCA)
ENGL-168-LC: TU 9:00 -10:50 am
ENGL-168-LC2: TU 1:00 - 2:50 pm 

Starting with the birth of detective fiction and ending with a recent novel about a policeman's murder of a black man, this course traces cultural fantasies about crime and criminality. We will consider what the fantasies inherent in whodunits, thrillers, and other crime literature reveal about gender, race, objectivity, morality, and the fundamental soundness of our justice system.

POLS-168-LC The Criminal Justice System

Pechulis (3 credits)
POLS-168-LC: M 9:00 am - 10:50 am
POLS-168-LC2: M 1:00 - 2:50 pm

Following the crime literature class, we will explore the practice of criminal law and the constitutional issues that arise in arrest, prosecutions, and punishments. We will look at policing in the past and policing today, as well as examine the criminal justice system.

LCIS-201-04 Integrative Seminar: Crime and Punishment: Legal Truths and Felonious Fictions

Fash, Pechulis (2 credits)
LCIS-201-04: W 9:00 - 10:20 am
LCIS-201-06: W 11:00 am - 12:20 pm

Exploring novels, comics, movies, television shows, podcasts, and news articles, this class will illuminate how crime is narrated and sensationalized, and how legal procedures are misrepresented or undermined in popular media.

5. France and Its Cultural Legacy 8 credits)

The art world experienced a radical shift during the latter part of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. Paris was at the center of this revolution as artists, musicians, and writers forged together new styles in the neighborhoods of Montmartre and Montparnasse. France and Its Cultural Legacy will explore the ways in which creators working in different disciplines influenced each other to bring about the birth of the modern world.

MUS-239-LC Music that Changed the World

Slowik (3 credits) (SH)
T 11:00 AM - 12:50 PM

Looking for new means of self-expression, musicians, artists and writers rejected traditional forms and methods of creativity in Paris at the turn of the 20th century. Our study includes these explosive new ways of creating music, art and literature that changed the world forever. Topics include Debussy, Impressionism, Ravel, musical influences of the exotic, Stravinsky and the Ballets Russes. Taught in English.

FREN-310M-LC Inside France: Studies in French Culture

Febles (3 credits) (GC)
M 9:00 - 10:50 AM

An in-depth exploration of the cultural history of France from the French Revolution to World War I with emphasis on Paris as the capital of the art and literary movements of the 19th century. Topics covered include the transformation of Paris during the Second Empire, Impressionism and its lasting effects on French culture, colonialism and representations of the exotic. Readings from Claire de Duras, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, and Apollinaire. Taught in English.

LCIS-201-05 Integrative Seminar: France and its Cultural Legacy

Slowik, Febles (2 credits)
W 9:00 - 10:20 AM

The integrative seminar will bring together music, art, and literature to illustrate how these different but related disciplines were in a constant dialogue throughout the 19th and 20th centuries in France. The seminar will include virtual visits to French museums (such as the Louvre and the Musée d’Orsay) and monuments (such as the Notre-Dame Cathedral). We will also attend virtual concerts and ballet performances produced by world-renowned Parisian venues (such as the Palais Garnier and the Paris Opera Ballet).