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Diabetes Review Course

Diabetes Review Course

All modules are self-paced and consist of an outline of a featured resource from the NCNBE (National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators) recommended reading list and our post-test. You may have access to the course until you complete the final test. You may take the final test as many times as needed to achieve the 75% passing rate. If you have any questions, please email Sari.Edelstein@simmons.edu.

Details:

Course cost: $500
Receive 12 CEs by passing a final test by 75%.
Instructor: Certified Diabetes Educator available for all questions.

Sample Module

Module 10:

Source: Armstrong, David G. and Lavery, Lawrence A. 2005). Clinical Care of the Diabetic Foot. American Diabetes Association. Canada.

Outline:

  • The Role of Systemic Disease in Diabetic Foot Complications
    • Rule of 15
      • 15% of people with diabetes develop ulcers
      • 15% of ulcers develop osteomyelitis
      • 15% of ulcers result in amputation
    • 60% of all diabetes cost are for inpatient care
    • Half of those with amputations will die within 5 years
    • Most amputations are a result of this causal pathway
      • Peripheral neuropathy
      • Trauma
      • Ulceration
      • Full — thickness skin defect in the subcutaneous tissue
      • Faulty healing
    • Microvascular disease contributes to abnormal blood flow, inflammatory response, and angiogenesis in patients with diabetes and neuropathy
  • Pathogenesis of Diabetic Foot Complications —The most common pathological lesion in diabetic neuropathy is "Demyelinization" and atrophy of peripheral nerve axons.
    • Neuropathies
      • Peripheral sensory â†' insensate foot (e.g. Charcot's foot)
      • Motor Neuropathy â†' Deformities — high arch, missing fat pads.
      • Vascular disease â†' amputation
      • Infection — delayed healing
      • Ulceration
    • Charcot — Swollen, warm, red foot
      • Insensate foot
      • Demineralization fractures
      • Convex plantar surface
      • Rocker bottom
      • "Bag of bones" - bone decomposition
    • Motor neuropathy - "Pes Cavus shape"
      • Atrophy of muscles
      • Physical deformities
      • Loss of arch, claw toes
    • Autonomic Neuropathy
      • Anhydrosis â†' dry skin â†' cracks â†' infection
      • Denervation â†' edema and pressure â†' capillary collapse
    • Vascular disease â†' poor circulation.
      • 3â„4 People with diabetes of 15 year duration have peripheral sensory neuropathy
      • 3â„4 Peripheral sensory poly-neuropathy —major risk factors for ulceration and amputation.

(truncated at 2 pages)

Sample Post Test

Questions:

  1. 15% of people with diabetes get ulcers which develop osteomyelitis and result in amputations, this is referred to as
    1. 15 by 15 by 15
    2. Rule of 15
    3. Rule of 45
    4. Inevitable 15
    5. None of the above
  2. Which risk factors is accountable is 1/3 of all cases of foot ulcers
    1. Foot deformity
    2. Neuropathy
    3. Peripheral arterial disease
    4. Plantar callus accumulation
    5. Peripheral edema
  3. Corns, calluses, bunions, hammertoes, and prominent metatarsal heads are all aspects of which part of the diabetic foot examination
    1. Gross inspection
    2. Patient history
    3. Dermatologic examination
    4. Neuropathy screening
    5. Vascular examination
  4. A significant finding of vibration perception threshold for neuropathy screening is
    1. >10
    2. <15
    3. >25
    4. <0.9
    5. None of the above
  5. Healthy People 2010 seeks to prevent how many amputations
    1. 10%
    2. 15%
    3. 25%
    4. 50%
    5. 55%
  6. The IWGDF classifies risk of patients with neuropathy but no deformity or PAD into which group
    1. Group 0
    2. Group 1
    3. Group 2
    4. Group 3
    5. None of the above
  7. 1 year post the first occurrence of a foot ulcer, the rate of reoccurrence is approximately
    1. 10%
    2. 15%
    3. 28%
    4. 55%
    5. 100%
  8. When patients where inappropriate footwear and have increased activity at weddings, funerals, religious events, or vacations leading to an ulcer, it is called
    1. Activity ulcer
    2. Special ulcer
    3. Occasional ulcer
    4. Holiday ulcer
    5. None of the above
  9. The classification system for ulcers is
    1. Meggitt-Wagner system
    2. UT system
    3. PEDIS
    4. None of the above
    5. All of the above

(truncated at #9)

12 CEs for Nurses and Dietitians