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Spring 2010 (volume 57)

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Wake up and Smell the Condoms. There's more to Know than Abstinence: An Analysis of Sex Education Programs in the United States, the Netherlands, France, and Germany
Kelly Bell

Abstract

Full Text


Editors
Terry Müller, Director, Writing Center
Lauren Rizzuto, CAS Dean's Fellow

Student Editor
Erica Martinson

Editors
Terry Müller, Director, Writing Center
Lauren Rizzuto, CAS Dean's Fellow

Student Editor
Erica Martinson

Faculty Advisors & Reviewers
Cathryn Mercier, Associate Dean, CAS
Douglas Perry, Professor, English
Daren Graves, Assistant Professor, Education
Stephen Berry, Assistant Professor, History
Michael Jordan, Assistant Professor, Physics

Published by
Office of the Dean
College of Arts and Sciences
Simmons College
300 The Fenway
Boston, MA 02115

Wake up and Smell the Condoms. There's more to Know than Abstinence: An Analysis of Sex Education Programs in the United States, the Netherlands, France, and Germany

by Kelly Bell


The ability to control one's sexuality and make informed, responsible decisions about one's sexual health is a basic human right. The Netherlands, France and Germany protect this right by providing comprehensive sex education in their schools and implementing public programs to promote sexual health. Abstinence-only education in the United States denies American youth the right to sexual autonomy and prevents them from developing healthy sexual identities. Youth in the United States are far less sexually healthy than youth in these other countries. This paper will examine sex education policies and sexual health agendas in each of these countries and look to them for inspiration in proposing a new sex education and public health agenda for the United States.


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Kelly Bell is a Simmons College undergraduate and expects to graduate in January 2011. She is majoring in psychology and minoring in Women's and Gender Studies. After she graduates, Kelly plans to continue studying psychology in graduate school.



Sudanese Refugees in Chad: Addressing Violence against Women
Deana LaFauci

Abstract

Full Text


Editors
Terry Müller, Director, Writing Center
Lauren Rizzuto, CAS Dean's Fellow

Student Editor
Erica Martinson

Editors
Terry Müller, Director, Writing Center
Lauren Rizzuto, CAS Dean's Fellow

Student Editor
Erica Martinson

Faculty Advisors & Reviewers
Cathryn Mercier, Associate Dean, CAS
Douglas Perry, Professor, English
Daren Graves, Assistant Professor, Education
Stephen Berry, Assistant Professor, History
Michael Jordan, Assistant Professor, Physics

Published by
Office of the Dean
College of Arts and Sciences
Simmons College
300 The Fenway
Boston, MA 02115

Sudanese Refugees in Chad: Addressing Violence against Women

by Deana LaFauci


The displacement of thousands of Sudanese refugees from Darfur into the neighboring country of Chad and the ongoing violence being perpetrated against women in Chadian refugee camps deserves more attention from the international community. This paper aims to address the plight of Sudanese women and girls in refugee camps in Eastern Chad and to detail the abuses committed against them, including rape and other violence. I address the contributing factors to the prevalence of violence against refugee women, including local resentment and increased competition over resources. I also outline key ways to establish and maintain security for refugee women in Chad, including support for UN programs like UN Mission in Central African Republic and Chad (MINURCAT) and Integrated Security Detachment (DIS), which establish security and justice, and for innovative, private humanitarian programs like Solar Cookers International (SCI), which address resource depletion.


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Deana LaFauci will graduate from Simmons College in May 2012 with a B.A. in English Literature. She is a member of the Simmons Undergraduate College Honors Program.  Deana serves on the Student Finance Board and is an officer for the Commuter Student Organization, English Liaison and Honors Liaison. Her scholarly interests include American contemporary literature, communications, political science and human rights. She is currently employed as an Internal Communications Assistant at Comcast.



Presenting Fearful Fantasies of the Future as Farce: How Back to the Future Used Comedy to Assuage Fears of Technology
Stephanie Goodman

Abstract

Full Text


Editors
Terry Müller, Director, Writing Center
Lauren Rizzuto, CAS Dean's Fellow

Student Editor
Erica Martinson

Editors
Terry Müller, Director, Writing Center
Lauren Rizzuto, CAS Dean's Fellow

Student Editor
Erica Martinson

Faculty Advisors & Reviewers
Cathryn Mercier, Associate Dean, CAS
Douglas Perry, Professor, English
Daren Graves, Assistant Professor, Education
Stephen Berry, Assistant Professor, History
Michael Jordan, Assistant Professor, Physics

Published by
Office of the Dean
College of Arts and Sciences
Simmons College
300 The Fenway
Boston, MA 02115

Presenting Fearful Fantasies of the Future as Farce: How Back to the Future Used Comedy to Assuage Fears of Technology

by Stephanie Goodman


When the personal computer was released in the early 1980s, it was met with a great deal of hesitation and fear, and representations of technology in film reflected this distrust and in fact, furthered it. So how has the computer, in just over two decades, raised to such levels of acclaim? After viewing several films and researching perceptions of technology in the 1980s, I came to the conclusion that most fearful representations of technology were created from the technologist determinist viewpoint. However, the movie Back to the Future presented an alternative humanist view and more importantly, combined this idea with humor and comedy to create a movie that made previous representations seem absurd. This paper explores this notion as well as technophobic images, and tries to show how important the film medium is and how differing representations can elicit very specific audience reactions in regards to technology and its reception.


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Stephanie Goodman is currently enrolled in Simmons College's Master of Arts in English program and hopes to graduate in May 2011. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Education and English from Emmanuel College. When she is not working as a contracted administrator, she enjoys decorating cakes, spinning her own yarn and learning about technology.


Essays & Studies, The Simmons College Academic Journal, is published by the College of Arts and Sciences.

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