Skip to this page's content

Voluntary Recall of Chobani Greek Yogurt Products

September 6, 2013

Greek yogurt is a popular choice with consumers because of its higher protein content and smooth texture. Chobani Inc. is a company that is well-known for producing this type of yogurt.

The company announced in the last week that it is recalling products with expiration dates of September 7 through October 7 (batch 16-012) due to a potential concern related to reports of gastrointestinal discomfort after eating their products. Some sources have reported that the product recall was caused by mold. However, the actual cause of spoilage is still under investigation by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 

Read more: Chobani, Inc. Voluntarily Recalls Greek Yogurt Because of Product Concerns

FDA weighs in on "Gluten-Free" & "No Gluten" labeling

August 12, 2013

New rules from the Food and Drug Administration now require foods voluntarily labeled as "gluten-free" and "no gluten" to prove it. Foods must contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten to claim it on their labels. This new definition from the FDA is an example of the implementation of the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA). Gluten is a protein allergen found in wheat, barley, rye, and some other grains.

Dietary gluten avoidance is the only method of treatment for persons with Celiac Disease, a chronic small intestine condition that can cause other serious health concerns. Other individuals are sensitive to gluten-containing foods and also choose to avoid eating gluten.

Read more: FDA defines "gluten-free" for food labeling

Read more: Avoiding hidden food allergens

Read more: "Gluten-free" foods will finally be regulated, a boon for those with Celiac Disease

Hepatitis A Outbreak in Europe: Imported Berries

August 1, 2013

Earlier this summer, an outbreak of Hepatitis A in the United States was linked to frozen berries (see our story from June 1, 2013). Hepatitis A is a viral disease that affects the liver. It can be spread by contact with an infected person or when foods are handled by an infected person. Further, if water contaminated with human waste is used to wash produce, Hepatitis A contamination can occur.

Several European countries, including Italy and Ireland, experienced similar outbreaks of Hepatitis A this summer. These viral strains of Hepatitis A have also been linked to imported, frozen, ready-to-eat berry products.

Read more: Hepatitis A outbreak linked to imported berries

Food Safety at Farmers' Markets

July 20, 2013

Outdoor markets are a great way to support your area's farmers by buying directly from them. If you do buy from farmers' markets, it is quite important to follow food safety recommendations.

For example, a recent pilot study highlighted concerns over bacterial contamination. In the study, raw chicken purchased at farmers' markets were more likely to be contaminated with Salmonella sp. and Campylobacter sp. than raw chicken purchased at a supermarket.

Read more: Farmer's Market Chickens Higher in Bacteria

A Microbiological Comparison of Poultry Products Obtained from Farmers' Markets and Supermarkets in Pennsylvania

Always ensure that you keep your raw meat purchases cold and separated from ready-to-eat foods. Avoid cross-contamination by washing your hands between tasks and using separate cutting boards and kitchen utensils. Cook meats to an appropriate internal temperature: chicken should reach at least 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

Check out our helpful tips section for more information on safe food preparation at home.

 

Suspected Contamination of Injectable Steriod Prompts Recall

June 8, 2013

In October 2012, we highlighted a fungal meningitis outbreak with a suspected cause of injectable steriods from a compounding facility in Framingham, Massachusetts.

The FDA began investigating a Tennessee drug manufacturer after seven patients suffered from skin infections. The common cause is thought to be an injectable steroid for pain: methylprednisolone acetate. The company has recalled all of its injectable products in an attempt to prevent any additional cases. 

Read More: FDA alerts health care providers of adverse reactions associated with steroid injections from Main Street Family Pharmacy in Tennessee

Gut-Brain Connection: What Role Do Microbes Play?

June 7, 2013

Research suggests that we are not alone. Humans are colonized by a 'human microbiome' of microbes. These cells outnumber our own cells by 10 to 1. Many of those organisms are "good bugs" because they support health.

It appears that which microorganisms inhabit and form communities in our intestines can impact health, significantly. For example, a recent article in ScienceNews discusses the gut-brain connection and how it might be led by microbes. 

Read more: Microbes at home in your gut may also be influencing your brain


Frozen Berries Suspected in Hepatitis A Outbreak

June 1, 2013

Hepatitis A is a viral disease that affects the liver. It can be spread through direct contact with an infected person or through consuming contaminated foods. Immunization against Hepatitis A is an effective method of controlling most outbreaks, but this virus is still of concern in areas of the world with poor sanitation.

Sanitation control is an important role for anyone that produces food for the public. It is possible for many people to become ill from foods prepared by individuals that are infected.

Individuals in Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Arizona, and California were recently diagnosed with acute Hepatitis A. This multistate outbreak of Hepatitis A has tentatively been linked to "Townsend Farms Organic Anti-oxidant Blend" frozen berry product by the FDA and CDC. The viral genotype of Hepatitis A is rare in North America, but maybe linked to imported ingredients included in the product or handling by an ill employee.

Read more: Multistate outbreak of Hepatitis A potentially associated with a frozen berry blend food product

How Hygienic Is Your Handbag?

May 18, 2013

Fecal coliforms are one of the groups of microorganisms scientists use to gauge the hygiene of shared surfaces. The presence of fecal coliforms suggests transfer of some of the pathogens that could be present in feces.

Shared surfaces in bathrooms are often tested for fecal coliforms with a goal of developing better cleaning practices. A recent article suggests we should be looking beyond the bathroom to handbags.

Washing your hands after using the bathroom is a common practice. Do you wash your hands before and after you touch your personal items?

Read more: Study shows handbags are home to more bacteria than a toilet flush

Most Food Recalls Are Now Multiple Product Recalls

May 17, 2013

According to a recent article, most of the recent food recalls have been from companies issuing recalls of multiple products simultaneously. The most common reason for recalls in meat, poultry, and egg products were foreign objects mistakenly introduced during processing. The second most common reason was undeclared allergens in processed foods.

Both of these are of concern because many consumers rely heavily on processed foods, either for use in home cooking or by eating out at restaurants or food distribution centers that use partially processed items.

Read more: Food Recalls Driven by Companies Issuing Multiple Recalls in the First Quarter of 2013

Oral Microbes from Mom and Dad - Friend or Foe?

May 17, 2013

The microorganisms that colonize our bodies are members of the human microbiome. Many of these microorganisms are beneficial and support health. These microbial communities are founded at birth and develop based on diet, genetics, and exposure to microbes from the external environment. For example, some microorganisms stimulate our immune system to become better prepared for later attack or suppress pathogen overgrowth. Others produce compounds that are beneficial for health.

Studies have addressed how parenting practices may help - or hinder - the development of healthy oral microflora (microorganisms).

One study suggested that if parents used their own mouth to clean their child's dropped pacifier, their child would be less likely to develop allergies or sensitivities. Specifically, fewer children developed asthma, eczema, and other sensitivities if their parents sucked on their pacifier to clean it.

Read more: Pacifier Cleaning Practices and Risk of Allergy Development

Another study discussed the implications of microbiota swapping if a parent was prone to dental cavities. Some bacteria and/or microbial communities are more efficient at degrading tooth enamel. Streptococcus mutans is a bacterial species that has been implicated in dental caries and can be traced to saliva swapping between mom and baby.

Read more: The earlier the colonization by mutans Streptococci, the higher the caries prevalence at 4 years of age.

Family Dining: How Nutritious Is Their "Kid's Menu"?

April 15, 2013

A major restaurant trend is to provide a children's menu to entice families that choose to eat out more frequently. How appropriate are these meals for our children in an age of childhood obesity and an increased awareness of the contribution of food choices to chronic disease?

A recent article looked at various meals marketed towards children at major family-friendly a la carte dining chains. Many of them had more than double the calories, saturated fat, and sodium that is considered appropriate for the age group. Further, many of them do not feature fruits, vegetables, or sufficient fiber.

Read More: 97% of kids' meals are unhealthy, group says

 


 


Antibiotics in Agriculture

April 12, 2013

Over-use of antibiotics is warned against because it is a primary mechanism for microorganisms to develop antibiotic resistance. MRSA, for example, is an antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus that is of major concern in hospitals, as well as in community settings. When bacteria that cause disease become resistant to antibiotics, it becomes more difficult to treat the infections they cause.

In recent years, the CDC and other health care organizations have strongly advised doctors to prescribe antibiotics only as needed. Viral infections are not treated by antibiotics. Symptoms of the common cold and flu should be addressed in other ways. These public service campaigns have reduced unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions.

However, a majority of the antibiotics that are sold in the United States are sold for use in farming meat: for example, beef. The scale of meat farming in the US is significant and could be a source of multi-drug resistant pathogenic microorganisms.

 

Read more: Are Antibiotics In Our Meat Breeding Superbugs?


Norovirus Sickens Cruise Ship Passengers

March 21, 2013

Norovirus is a virus that causes nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and cramping. Individuals may also complain of fever and body aches, so norovirus is often called "stomach bug" or "stomach flu." Symptoms come on 24-48 hours after exposure and last as long as 2-3 days.

Norovirus made headlines again recently for its ability to spread rapidly when people live and eat in close proximity. This is because norovirus can be contracted from common touch surfaces. These surfaces include those in shared bathroom facilities and door handles.

Norovirus is responsible for almost half of reported foodborne illness outbreaks in the US between 2006-2010 (CDC). It can be spread easily at shared dining facilities, like those on a cruise ship, a cafeteria, a restaurant, or a dormitory. Individuals with norovirus symptoms should not prepare food for others, even at home.

Read more:

Does Your Doctor Cook?

March 19, 2013

A recent study indicates that healthcare providers that cook themselves are better at giving nutrition-related advice and maybe be more likely to think nutrition is important. Does your doctor cook?

Read more: Doctors who cook say they give better nutrition advice

Budget Cuts May Cut Food Safety Inspectors

February 14, 2013

Widespread budget-cuts are planned for March 1, 2013 as part of federal government "sequestration". These actions are expected to impact the ability of the FDA and USDA to provide timely food safety inspections. Food safety inspections are (and will still be) required of food production facilities and this could have a significant impact on consumer prices.

Read more: White House Warns of Food Safety Cuts

Read more: Industry: Government is Obligated to Provide Meat Inspection, Even With Sequester

Suspected Listeria Contamination Prompts Recall of Fully Cooked Meats

February 11, 2013

Listeria bacteria cause listeriosis, a rare food poisoning disease that can be fatal. Pregnant women, especially, should avoid foods that are more likely to be infected with listerosis, because of the disease's ability to move across the placenta and manifest as meningitis. Older adults and individuals with weakened immunity are also at greater risk for infection from contaminated foods.

Foods recently linked to Listeria contamination include:

  • ready-to-eat meats: deli meat, hot dogs
  • select raw fruits (i.e. cantaloupes)
  • unpasteurized milk
  • soft cheeses
In a recent case, Listeria contamination has been linked to fully cooked pork, chicken, and beef products listed in this blog post by Food Safety News. Although Listeria is killed by cooking, it can multiply slowly at colder temperatures (i.e. the refrigerator). If fully cooked products are not reheated appropriately in the kitchen, listerosis is of concern from handling or consuming contaminated products.

 


US Commodity Food Safety Concerns Highest for Poultry and Produce

February 10, 2013

Food commodities are agricultural products that the US government supports through subsidization and distribution. Tracking safety of food commodity products is important because some segments of the population consume them regularly. For example, food commodities are central to the National School Lunch Program.

A recent study reviewed data of food-related illnesses (1998-2008) connected to food commodities. This data suggests that of the outbreaks connected to food commodities, almost half of these food-related illnesses are connected to produce. The same analysis of outbreaks suggested that contaminated poultry caused the most deaths in that time period.

In an interview reported by the NY Times, the co-author of the study reported noted that on a per-meal basis, the risk of food illness from produce is low.

Read more: http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/19/3/11-1866_article.htm

Best Practices in Lettuce Handling May Not Be Enough

January 17, 2013

An E. coli outbreak in Canada has be traced - using genetic fingerprinting - to a California grower of salad greens. This E. coli strain, O1H57: H7, can cause food poisoning that includes acute hemorrhagic diarrhea. In the developed world, this strain is most likely to be acquired from eating contaminated ready-to-eat foods, including fresh produce, or eating undercooked meats.

The grower participates in a program of strict food handling guidelines, above and beyond mandatory practices. Other growers in the program, termed Leafy Green Marketing Agreement (LGMA), are very interested to know how this outbreak could have occurred despite the implementation of best practices.

Read more: E.coli-Contaminated Lettuce Came from a California LGMA Grower

Other News

Sitemap