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While the Career Education Center (CEC) employs several full-time staff members (whose photos and bios are available on our Meet The Staff page), our office would not be able to operate as effectively in serving you if not for our student employees. These students assist with our day-to-day operations, including scheduling appointments, responding to emails, posting job opportunities to CareerLink and CA$H, and creating and posting marketing materials. 

We have seven student employees this Fall, and to help you get to know them a little better, here is some info on each of them:

Lily Dearing

SCA Headshot_Lily D.jpgLily is a first-year student, so this is her first semester working for the CEC. She is majoring in Communications. Previous to  Simmons she attended North Yarmouth Academy in Maine, and enjoys theater, dance, and volunteering.

 

Cailin Fredrickson

SCA Headshot_Cailin F.jpgCailin is a sophomore studying Public Health. She joined the CEC this past summer. Prior to this semester, she attended the University of Massachusetts - Boston. Outside of class and her work with the CEC, Cailin plays on the Simmons volleyball team.

 

Shen Gao

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Shen is a sophomore and began working at the CEC this semester. She transferred to Simmons College from the University of Massachusetts - Lowell, and is studying Biology. Shen has volunteered at both My Brother's Table and Tufts Medical Center. She also plays piano and is fluent in Mandarin.

 

Lyndlee Hayes

SCA Headshot_Lyndlee H.jpgLyndlee is a senior and is majoring in Communications: Public Relations and Marketing. She is the CEC's Marketing Assistant, responsible for designing and creating marketing materials for our events. She started working for the CEC this semester. Previously, she has worked at the Seacoast Science Center in Rye, NH as a Marketing Intern, and at Life is Good in Boston as a Sales Associate.

Teressa Peck

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A junior majoring in Nursing, this is Teressa's first semester working at the CEC. Prior to this job, she has worked at the Veteran's Administration - Boston, The Goldenrod Restaurant (in York, ME), and the Hyde Park Mentoring Program.

 

Camille Shaw-Pigeon

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This is Camille's third semester working at the CEC. She is a junior majoring in Management, and transferred to Simmons in the Fall of 2013 from Wheaton College. Camille also works for the Simmons Admissions Office.

 

Katharine Silva

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Katharine is an Arts Administration/Music major and a first-year student. She graduated from Brookline High School this past May, and volunteers with the Samaritans Suicide Prevention Hotline. As you can see from the picture, she also plays trumpet, and has worked as a Private Trumpet Instructor.



Have a work-study award and interested in joining the ranks of the student employees above? The CEC typically has openings, posted on CA$H, at the start of the Fall and Spring semesters, as well as at the start of the summer. Keep a lookout on the job board, and apply for an opening. We look forward to hearing from you!

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With the fall and start-up of classes once again it is also the beginning of a new season of campus events. Among these are several opportunities for students to learn about potential careers in a number of different fields, from experts in those fields who have been there/done that.     

With the Pre-Law Forum now behind us, next up is tonight's opportunity to Explore Careers in Foreign Service at the fall's inaugural Warburg Panel event, "A World in Crisis: Diplomacy Today & Careers in Foreign Service." This event will bring three former and one current US Ambassador to campus to address these two topics. The program runs from 6-8 pm in the LKP Conference Center. Representatives from the State Dept. will be on hand to field your questions. Refreshments served. Read an interview in the "300 The Fenway" blog with Warburg Professor and panel moderator Ambassador (ret.) Mark Bellamy.  

Other upcoming career exploration events include the following:

  • 10/8/14, Explore Careers in Teaching - Alumnae Panel - Come meet and learn from former Simmons Education students who are now  teaching. Enjoy some pizza while you learn about life in the classroom and the Simmons BA + Master's degree programs in SPED, Secondary Education, Elementary, or ESL.
  • 10/16/14, Peace Corps Campus Visit Day - We are thrilled to welcome RPCV (Returning Peace Corps Volunteer) Katrina Deutsch for a day on the Simmons campus, when she is here expressly to meet you! She will host an Info Table from 11-1 in the Fens Lower Level Lobby, drop-in hours from 2-3:30 pm (Common Grounds), and an Info Session from 4-5 pm (Career Resource Center, M-106). Learn how to apply and sign up for this life-changing experience that will allow you to both see and serve the world.

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  • 10/22/14, Explore Careers in Communications - CCCOB Communications & Marketing Careers Information Exchange - Last year over 180 students attended this event, produced annually by the six College Career Centers of Boston: Boston College, Boston University, Emerson, Emmanuel, Simmons, and Suffolk. This year the event will be held at Suffolk from 5:30-7:30 pm. Representatives from more than a dozen companies in these two fields will be present for this round table event, including Allen & Gerritsen, Cengage Learning, Fleishman Hillard, Mullen, NESN, WBUR, WHDH, and many more.           
  • 11/6/14, Explore Careers in Financial Services - Fidelity Investments Info Session - Join us in the Career Resource Center (M-106) as we host representatives from Fidelity Investments from 5-6:30 pm. They will provide an overview of the company and industry as well as a description of internship and entry-level opportunities with the Boston-based firm, a national leader in investments and mutual funds.       

Want more? Watch the Career Education Center website Events calendar and Facebook and Twitter pages for event updates and new listings. Don't miss these opportunities to learn from and network with employers. We hope to see you at one or more of these special programs! 

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Stress can be an everyday way of life during college: the late nights, constant deadlines, growing list of activities both in and out of class, the anticipation leading up to mid-term and final exams. This is true not only for undergraduate students attending during the "traditional" ages of 18 - 22, but also equally so (if not more so) for adult students and graduate students, who may have to balance the responsibilities of family, home maintenance, and a full-time job alongside their educational responsibilities.

On this last point I can speak from personal experience: I am currently attending graduate school part-time while also working full-time here at Simmons. I also need to devote time to my wife, house, parents, and wonderful (but at times exhausting) two-year-old son.

How does one go about handling the balance between a career and school, and the stress that comes with trying to do both at the same time? According to the article "How Successful People Deal With Stress" by author Bernard Marr, some ways to help manage stress include:

  • Practicing gratitude
  • Staying positive
  • Focusing on progress
  • Taking care of yourself
  • Following routines
  • Seeing the big picture

To this list, I would add from my own experience:

  • Enlist the support of someone (a spouse or significant other, family member, close friend) in helping take care of some of the day-to-day tasks
  • Prioritize, and be realistic about what is truly necessary and what is just nice to have
  • Make at least a little time every day to do something you enjoy beyond school and work
  • Stick to deadlines (even if they are only informal ones)
  • Get enough sleep
  • When balancing competing school and work priorities of equal importance, do the one you would like to avoid first

And lastly:

  • Don't be too hard on yourself when you forget to follow most of the advice above

After all, who has time for advice when you've got a paper due, a presentation tomorrow at work, and the little one is sick?

Photo Source: Wikipedia Entry on Occupational Stress

AW-Cropped Head Shot.jpgThe following post originally ran in the fall of 2013 and is back by popular demand.  - Ed.

Are you excited to begin your journey at Simmons, but feel unsure of choosing a major or career path? You are not alone.  Nationwide, 80% of college-bound students still haven't decided on a major, and 50 percent of those that have chosen will switch majors two to three times throughout their college experience, according to Fitz Grupe, founder of MyMajors.com.

As an entering student, you are faced with many new, immediate decisions, and "career" may not be foremost on your mind.  Yet, you do need to plan ahead for graduation and a career. After all, college is one of the biggest investments both financially and personally in your life, so freshman year is not too early to start. I want you to know that Simmons is a student-learning community that provides you with strong academics combined with career preparation which can give you a leg up in today's market. 

As a first step in planning for your career, I am inviting you to visit the CEC and tap into the many services and resources that we have to offer. The CEC uses the STEPS Career Development Plan that helps you acquire knowledge of yourself, career paths and future opportunities. Take advantage of our personalized career coaching, skill-building workshops, employer and recruiting events that all focus on increasing your career readiness and success.

My advice to incoming First-Years:

  • Discover and explore your interests through volunteering, joining student organizations/groups as you will learn more about yourself by strengthening and developing new skills from communication to leadership
  • Be proactive and do the research to find a career you will really enjoy by reading the Career Guides at Beatley Library on "What Can I Do With this Major?" 
  • Keep a wide lens around the variety of jobs and employers by taking advantage of the multiple employer and career events on campus
  • Identify internship opportunities that will strengthen your knowledge and skills in a field of interest and utilize CareerLink, and for work-study jobs go to the CA$H job board
  • Make connections with people as networking is the best way to learn about careers, find an internship or job
  • Seek the advice you need to prepare, plan and implement your goals through advising and individualized career coaching
  • Remember that you are responsible for your own future, so take charge, explore beyond the classroom and seek opportunities at Simmons to get to know the world of work

And, don't wait until your Senior Year to get to know the CEC. Whether you are clear or unclear on what you want, those who start early are better prepared for successful careers.

Learn more in the Undergraduate section of our website.

 

Andrea Wolf is the Director of the Simmons Career Education Center.

 

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With the school year almost underway, many of you are likely looking for an on-campus job opportunity, either to add some money to your bank account or to fulfill the work-study component of your financial aid award.

Simmons College offers an online job board, CA$H, where you can search for on-campus jobs, both those open to all students and those specifically reserved for students with work-study awards. Also listed on the site are off-campus opportunities to earn your work-study award at local not-for-profit organizations, including Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, and the Museum of Fine Arts.

To get started on CA$H, you will need to get access to your user name and password. We directly upload student profiles to the system, so to activate your profile, click on "Forgot Your Password?" under the Student section on the CA$H launch page. Enter your user name (which will be "lastnamefirstinitial" or the first eight letters of your last name if your last name is eight letters or longer) and an email with a reset password will be sent to your Simmons email address. Use your default user name and the reset password to log into your CA$H profile. Be sure to update and add to your profile information! You can also add a resume to your profile and submit it directly to potential on-campus employers through CA$H.

Once on CA$H, you'll be able to search either General Employment (open to all Simmons students) or Work-Study job opportunities. Please be sure to read the descriptions of the jobs you are interested in, and follow the application instructions for that specific job. Each job has to be applied to separately and may have different application requirements.

For more details on CA$H, please visit the CA$H student resource page. Having trouble finding an on-campus or work-study job? Please contact the Career Education Center at 617-521-2488 or careers@simmons.edu to set up a time to speak with a career coach about any aspect of careers or the job search.

Photo: Courtesy of Pixabay

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Today increasing numbers of job seekers are using a mobile device in their job search.  Career Builder reports that almost one-third of site traffic each month comes from mobile devices.  According to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal, "Companies and recruiting experts believe mobile recruiting will help them engage candidates such as young workers who may not have computers at home but are glued to their smartphones."

This development has arisen with the trends of social networking, cloud computing and use of QR codes.  International Data Corp predicts that in 2015 there will be more consumers in the US accessing the Internet via mobile devices vs. PC's.

Did you know that 63% of Americans access LinkedIn and Facebook on their mobile devices according to Nielsen, a market research firm? Because more people are hearing of job openings on their phone, there is a growing increase in mobile job searching and applications.

An example is  a new application called The Ladders.  It delivers job opportunities directly to mobile devices which offers job seekers a fast approach to connect with employers.  The Ladders.com launched in June and said that more than 100,000 people downloaded their app within the first week. The app allows users to click a thumbs-up icon for a specific job of interest which immediately signals an alert to employers.

You can use Beatley Library's new Mobile Apps for Job Hunting Guide to learn more about using your mobile device to find a job and discover some of the most recommended applications.

 

Andrea Wolf is Director of the Simmons Career Education Center.

 

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As we all know we are in the thick of Commencement season. Podium wisdom is being dispensed left and right over the course of these several weeks by distinguished elders, typically accomplished adults who have been there, done that and are sharing their hard earned life truths.    

But wait a minute - here's a distinguished elder who just got fired from her job, in a very public way, from a very presitigious and visible role. What would she have to tell us? 

I am talking, of course, about Jill Abramson, the former Executive Editor of the New York Times who was dismissed by Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger, Jr. just prior to her scheduled appearance as Commencement speaker at Wake Forest University in North Carolina.

As Abramson told the assembled graduates and their families and friends, "What's next for me? I don't know. So I'm in exactly the same boat as many of you!'' Abramson also averred that "like you, I am a little scared, but also excited." 

Now, have you ever wondered why they call it "Commencement" when it is the very LAST thing you do in your entire college experience?  Why it is called a beginning when it is quite obviously an ending?

Well, because it is the beginning, the beginning of the rest of your life! And as Abramson learned and related, life doesn't quit, no matter what age or how accomplished or how celebrated you are. It keeps happening, keeps coming at you.

Unlike some of the other colleges that rescinded their Commencement speakers' invitations this season, Wake Forest kept their promise and followed through with Abramson, even though she had just been knocked off her high perch. Astute university President Nathan Hatch asked her to speak about the importance of resilience, and she did, quoting her father who, Abramson said, was less interested in how his daughters' dealt with their successes than how they dealt with their setbacks. That's when you have to "show what you are made of", Abramson's father told his children.

'''And now I'm talking to anyone who's been dumped," said Abramson, "not gotten the job you really wanted, or received those horrible rejection letters from grad school -- you know the sting of losing or not getting something you badly want. When that happens, show what you are made of.''

Despite having recently swallowed such a bitter pill, Abramson was upbeat and told the audience that it was "the honor of my life to lead the newsroom" of the New York Times. That's keeping things in perspective.

I recommend that you take 11 minutes out of your life and watch Abramson's speech. And as you make your way on life's not-always-so-straight path, remember her advice. Things will not always go as planned or to your liking. And at those times, you will need to bounce back, to get up off the mat, to "show what you are made of." To paraphrase Abramson and her father, when life deals you a lemon, make lemonade.  

Photo: Courtesy Boston Globe / Jason Miczek / Reuters  

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It's that time of year, when college seniors robe up and cross the stage to receive a handshake and a sheepskin. All of them are proud and excited but many of them are also apprehensive about the real world and their employment prospects.

Well, some very positive news on the job market has come out recently, which should help ease the anxiety of this year's crop of graduates. The Department of Labor  just released figures for the month of April at the end of last week, and the national unemployment rate fell to 6.3% (from 6.7% in March), the lowest it has been in over five years, since before the big meltdown of the Great Recession in September, 2008. (This happens to coincide almost exactly with my time as Associate Director of Employer Relations here at Simmons, so this is welcome news indeed.)

Also in April, employers in the US added 288,000 jobs, the most for a single month in the past two years. "Not only is job growth continuing, but it is accelerating,'' said Patrick O'Keefe, director of economic research at the accounting and consulting firm CohnReznick. Read the full article from Friday's Boston Globe.

​And the beat goes on. The Massachusetts unemployment rate for March, the latest month for which figures are available, was also at 6.3%. See the dramatic ups and downs of the employment market over the last ten years in this infographic depciting both the state and national unemployment rates that accompanies the Globe article.

And. . .the beat goes on! As the National Association of Colleges and Employers (aka, NACE) reports in their April 16 press release on the hiring outlook for new college grads, "employers plan to hire 8.6% more Class of 2014 graduates than they hired from the Class of 2013." This data comes from the spring update of their hiring outlook survey with employers nationwide.
 
The story was picked up by CNBC which also ran an article on the improved employment outlook for college grads on its website.
 
Click through the links above to to get more detail in the stories and the breakdown by industry.
 
So take heart, graduates!  And remember: you only need one job to get you going. So get that resume and cover letter polished up along with your elevator pitch and get out there and take advantage of the upswing in the market. You can do it. And congratulations on your degree! 
 
 
Photo: Courtesy CNBC/Thomas Barwick/Digital Vision/Getty Images

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So often our non-verbal speech is louder than our spoken words.  A few years ago, after listening to a presentation I was making, a well-repected consultant at Simmons offered me feedback I have never forgotten. He commended me on how well prepared I was on the topic, but noted that my welcoming comments had failed to capture the audience because they had not been accompanied by a warm smile and a sufficient show of enthusiasm for what I was about to share. In other words, my non-verbals had not validated my spoken message. 

Preparation is an important component in helping to build your self-confidence, but mindful attention to your non-verbal speech and body language, is equally as important in getting your message across. This becomes critical when you are called upon to market yourself in networking situations, interviews or job negotiations.  You might spend a great deal of time carefully crafting words to send just the right message.  However, your non-verbals can either convince the listener or undermine what you say.  

Oftentimes, women in particular do not own and convey the inherent power that they have through non-verbal communication.  Research has shown that men generally take up more space than women and thus often gain a power advantage.  In the context of a job search, confidence is a key to creating your own space and thereby gaining credibility. This concept is so important that career coaches have been known to advise clients to "bluff" confidence even when the person is unsure of herself.  

Certainly, your posture affects you as well as other people.  It's hard to feel "in charge" if you have your knees together, your elbows close to your sides, and are leaning forward!  Practicing the "Power Pose" before an important meeting, interview or negotiating session gives you a real boost. Try it! Spread your feet to shoulder width, put your hands on your hips, stand very tall and look up to the sky. Hold this pose for two minutes. Taking more space makes you appear and feel more relaxed and confident. It isn't just the quality of your answers during an interview that will impact the outcome.  It's also your non-verbal messages that will go a long way toward persuading an employer to hire you!

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Bon voyage and best of luck! Following are fifteen pieces of real world advice I want to share with you as you transition from college to career:

 

 

1.  Go for it! Don't delay the job search after graduation as you may not realize that it takes several months, so if you haven't  already started, start now.

2. Know yourself. Know your passion, strengths, aspirations and what you want out of life.  You are in charge of your career. Know there are many ways to express your passion in a career and there are multiple paths.

3. Know the organization. Do your homework and research the organization to understand the culture and what the employer seeks.

4. Build relationships. Find professionals in your industry and seek their advice and guidance by asking good questions.  You can learn how they got a foot in the door and how they grew their career.  They may also have other contacts for you.

5. How you present yourself is key to your success. Share your story that demonstrates your interests, experiences, accomplishments and special qualities.

6. Let go of limiting beliefs and take risks. Have a positive outlook as that will impact everything. You may need to take some risks and from them you will always learn something whether you succeed or fail.

7. Not all advice is good advice. Your parents and friends may have good intentions, but know that in a changing economy, the job search process has changed.  Seek advice from professionals and career experts who have a pulse on the job market.

8. Apply for jobs that are a good fit. Don't jump at the first job offer if you are not excited about it.  You may feel pressure to take the first job you are offered in order to pay the bills, but research shows that you won't last long.  When you are motivated by a job, you end up accomplishing more and feeling more satisfied.

9. Create a strong online profile. Polish your LinkedIn profle as today more recruiters are sourcing for candidates online.  Make sure to show your strengths and what is unique about you.

10. Have perserverance in the job search.  If you are not chosen for a job, look at it as a learning experience and understand that the hiring process is complex and not an even playing field.  Ask yourself if you are presenting your best self in the interview.  If so, accept the loss and move forward.

11. Your attitude, energy and outlook matter.  Be aware of yourself and demonstrate with enthusiasm  the strengths you bring to the table. Also, stay on top of market trends and what employers seek in job candidates.

12. Exhibit a professional demeanor: Dress professionally and be aware of basic manners. Stand out from the crowd by being polished and polite.

13. Manage your expectations. Although you may be ready to leap to a higher position, accept the fact that you may need to take the necessary steps to position yourself for the future.  The more you do to master your job, make a contribution and prove yourself, the greater are the opportunities to grow your career.

14. Your first job is a starting point.  Your first job is not about making a decision for the rest of your life, but see it as a jumping off point towards your future.

15. A career is not a straight, but windy path. Discover what you like and do well that aligns with your values and this will serve you well throughout your life.

Andrea Wolf is Director of Simmons Career Education Center