Simmons.edu

Key Content Areas

What moves you? 

Your undergraduate experience is a time to prepare for your future goals. It's also a chance to explore areas outside your field -- to think critically, pursue passions, and prepare for lifelong learning. 

The key content areas are broad. Each represents a way of thinking about the world and approaching complex topics. Mastering each one will help you develop fully as an independent thinker, prepared not just to understand the world's problems, but to help solve them. 

See the current KCA and Quantitative Literacy Options.

Aesthetic, Literary and Artistic (ALA)

Courses in this area focus on phenomena in art and literature as well as ways of knowing or creating original works or aesthetic approaches to these phenomena. This requirement can be met by courses in any of the creative and performing arts as well as in any courses in the study of literature, art and music. Courses in other disciplines that provide perspectives of aesthetic, literary, and artistic phenomena as defined above also meet this requirement. For example, a course that studies the digital or computational aspects of artistic creation would meet this requirement.

Global Cultural (GC)

The term global cultural is broadly construed; it includes all cultures, past and present, within and beyond the US, and in their multiple forms of manifestation. Courses in this area offer our students the opportunity to understand and learn to appreciate cultural differences as they have made themselves manifest in humankind. This requirement can be met by courses in any discipline—from the liberal arts, to the sciences, and the professions–that provide a multicultural perspective of the world. For example, courses that focus on cross-cultural practices, or on minority cultures in the US, or on non-European cultures, or that provide world surveys of cultures would all meet this requirement.

Scientific Inquiry (SCI)

Courses in this area focus on phenomena in the natural and physical world and on ways of knowing these phenomena, particularly through experimental approaches. This requirement is primarily met by courses in the sciences and psychology; the requirement may also be met by courses in other disciplines providing perspectives on scientific phenomena. All courses meeting this requirement include a "hands on" component providing student the opportunity to understand and appreciate the scientific method.

Social and Historical (SH)

Courses in this area focus on phenomena in society and history as well as ways of knowing these phenomena. This requirement can be met by courses in the social sciences, including economics, political science, sociology, social psychology, social work, and history. Courses in other disciplines that provide perspectives of social and historical phenomena as defined above also meet this requirement. For example, a course that focuses on the social applications of management principles would provide such perspectives.